A victim of childhood bullying, Detroit Tiger Prince Fielder encouraged students Thursday night to help put an end to bullying in their schools. "Obviously, if you're seeing someone get bullied, you know it's not right ... just tell someone," Fielder said at the "Strike Out Bullying" forum at Royal Oak Middle School. Presenters at the event, part of the Detroit Tigers 2013 Winter Caravan, offered tips on how to deal with bullies, urged students to respect others' differences and warned that bullying can lead to violence or even suicide. "Put yourself in the victim's shoes," U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade told the crowd in the school's auditorium. McQuade said tools like Facebook give children the power to bully in a harsh, expansive way. She said students should peacefully stand up for other kids who are being bullied, tell a teacher or parent if they or someone else is being bullied and walk away if they become the target of a bully...

 
 
(Original Article Found At respectme.org.uk)

Just over two thirds of the Scottish population reported having a religion in the 2001 census. The most common faith was Christianity followed by Islam, Buddhism, Sikhism, Judaism and Hinduism. 27% of people stated their religion as 'other' and 27.5% of people stated that they had no religion. Bullying based on religion is directed against individuals and groups because of their actual or perceived religious belief or their connection with a particular religion or belief. For example, someone may be targeted because of the religion of a friend or family member, or because they are wrongly assumed to belong to a particular faith community, due to their appearance. And even if the individual is, no one has the right to make them feel any less then other people. Persons may also experience bullying because they don't hold a particular faith or because of their philosophical beliefs that shape their view of the world they live in...